One Man, One Game: Federico Fazio PART ONE (vs Chelsea 01/01/2015)

If you know what you’re looking for, there’s a lot you can tell about a player from a single game of football (crucially, if you know what you’re looking for, you also know what you *haven’t* learned about a player from a single game as well). In the (thanks to Patreon) regular ‘One man, One game’ feature, I do just that.

Federico Fazio is an interesting case. At Tottenham Hotspur for 2014/15 before being kept off the wage books (presumably, at least partly) for the following two seasons, he was regarded as a flop in London, and had become something of a butt of jokes. Fast forward to 2017, and – first on loan, and then permanently this summer – at Roma he has emerged as one of their starting choices, displacing Antonio Rüdiger as the main man on the team-sheet alongside Kostas Manolas last season.

Opinions of players do swing wildly, but generally on a more short-term timescale, and often based heavily around one or two isolated moments in high-profile matches. With Fazio, the feeling – both with the mockery and the redemption – is, unusually, that his image has been altered by the long-term trends of his seasons in England and Italy.

So then, what’s the boy actually like? Is either reputation fully justified? Continue reading

Advertisements

One Man, One Game: Lewis Dunk (vs Leicester City 19/08/2017)

If you know what you’re looking for, there’s a lot you can tell about a player from a single game of football (crucially, if you know what you’re looking for, you also know what you *haven’t* learned about a player from a single game as well). In the hopefully regular ‘One man, One game’ feature, I do just that.

Lewis Dunk belongs to that class of players, so large that it must make the outsiders feel left out, who have been touted as a future star for about the length of time that most people retain interest in their fantasy football teams. From there, they – like your ‘Wanyamas in Pajamas’ et al – fade from memory until they’re mentioned by someone else, at which point the thought ‘ah yes, that name meant something to me once’ drifts through one’s mind.

Dunk, after having been deemed one of the best centre-back in the Championship for the past couple of seasons, now has his chance to prove himself at Premier League level. At 25, he’s probably past the stage of his career where he would make the leap upwards, if he was ever going to do it. At around 23, the age that Michael Keane (who Dunk has received comparisons to) had his break-out season, the chances of potential being reached are still pretty good. Above it, it becomes a matter of what they’re producing now. Continue reading

One Man, One Game: Davinson Sanchez (vs Manchester United, Europa League Final 2017)

If you know what you’re looking for, there’s a lot you can tell about a player from a single game of football (crucially, if you know what you’re looking for, you also know what you *haven’t* learned about a player from a single game as well). In the hopefully regular ‘One man, One game’ feature, I do just that.

We should start by dispelling a myth. Two myths, even. The first is what Jose Mourinho actually thinks of Davinson Sanchez’s ball-playing ability, which has been slightly overblown. The quote on the matter, as translated from the Tribuna Expresso, read “We let them go out to play, but blocking the right center, De Ligt, and letting the ball go to the left, Sanchez, who had more difficulties”.

I don’t read that quite the same as United targeting Sanchez as a specific weak point in the side, rather that United could limit Ajax’s build-up to an extent and that the better player to limit was De Ligt. Sanchez did indeed have difficulties, which is not exactly the same as that he has difficulties. (I’m also slightly suspicious about a manager talking through their tactical plans after the game has been won – it’s easy to spin things, whether by manager or by press, as genius decisions in hindsight of victory).

It’s also so misleading it should be expecting a visit from the Advertising Standards Agency. Continue reading

One Man, One Game: Paolo Maldini (vs Brazil, 1994 World Cup Final)

If you know what you’re looking for, there’s a lot you can tell about a player from a single game of football (crucially, if you know what you’re looking for, you also know what you *haven’t* learned about a player from a single game as well). In the hopefully regular ‘One man, One game’ feature, I do just that.

It is said that if a defender comes off the pitch with dirty shorts, then they’ve not done their job well enough. Paolo Maldini himself once (according to legend, at least) said that ‘If I have to make a tackle then I have already made a mistake’. Building, or bastardised, from this is the mythos surrounding Maldini and his supposed lack of tackles made.

It is worth noting that in some places in Europe, ‘tackle’ means slide tackling alone. Even so, Maldini – a young 26-years-old on the day of this World Cup Final – clearly had a bad game by his own words, because he made four or so things which could reasonably be called slide tackles. But merely pointing that out isn’t actual analysis (and it should be said that blindly deeming slide tackles ‘bad’ is, in itself, bad anyway).

Maldini started the game at centre-back, though moved to left-back late on in the first half when Luigi Apollino came on for Roberto Mussi. And though I joked about him having a bad game because of the amount of slide tackles he made, Maldini genuinely didn’t look comfortable at times.

This wasn’t because Brazil were overwhelming the Italy back-line though, despite Brazil’s amount of possession – the Brazilians struggled to break through Italy’s forward and midfield lines for long spells of the match. Continue reading

One Man, One Game: Granit Xhaka (vs Tottenham, 30/04/2017)

If you know what you’re looking for, there’s a lot you can tell about a player from a single game of football (crucially, if you know what you’re looking for, you also know what you *haven’t* learned about a player from a single game as well). In the hopefully regular ‘One man, One game’ feature, I do just that.

This week’s One Man, One Game takes on something of a departure, both similar and dissimilar to the recent Guardiola-esque experiment with Jose Gimenez. Similar in that Granit Xhaka is not a centre-back, dissimilar in that I’m not even interested in Xhaka being a centre-back. This is all about the stone-cold* midfield enforcer** himself.

*(Granit, geddit); **(funny because it isn’t true) Continue reading

Pilot: The ETNAR football podcast (David Luiz and the mythic 7-1 match), and why it exists

I’ll stick the embedded pod here, and then proceed to explain a bit of backstory below that, as that’s the less important bit.

If there’s one thread of the football stuff I do, it’s probably ‘hey, can this thing be done? No-one else seems to be doing it, or at least not like this. I think I can do it’. From that you get your: focus on centre-back and other defensive stats; centre-back eye-test analysis; making genuinely useful statistical and tactical analyses something people can enjoy reading; video analysis and *good* player highlight reels; obsession with making match reports relevant in the age of Twitter.

And, the latest question, ‘can you do meaningful analysis of a player’s game in audio form?’. Logic says no. People like the video analyses for a reason, and different things occupy different mediums for a reason. Some stuff is easier to understand visually, some verbally. But I listen to a lot of podcasts and, well, I’ve done video and done written word stuff. ‘The Pod’ is still a land left to conquer. So, yeah.

Have a listen. If you enjoy it, please share it as it took several hours longer than I was expecting it to (like with many of these things I listed having done above; fun story, I originally chose centre-back stats to focus on because I thought they would be easy). If you’ve got feedback, feel free to throw it my way too.

One Man, One Game: Miguel Britos (vs Southampton, 04/03/2017)

If you know what you’re looking for, there’s a lot you can tell about a player from a single game of football (crucially, if you know what you’re looking for, you also know what you *haven’t* learned about a player from a single game as well). In the hopefully regular ‘One man, One game’ feature, I do just that.

You may think Miguel Britos is a weird choice for a player to focus on, but it was a request from one of my Carles Puyol tier Patrons. This isn’t to pass the buck. It’s to say that if there’s someone that you’d like featured, you can back the Patreon at $5+ a month and your suggestions will take priority, as well as access to other features like the exclusive thoughts on the Patreon blog.

Given all of the relatively obscure centre-backs that could have been suggested, I was also pretty happy to look at Britos. Watford’s centre-back situation has interested me pretty much since they’ve been back in the Premier League, as all of them seem to vacillate quite strongly between performing well and performing badly. It was a pleasure to have an excuse to look at one of them in more depth. Continue reading